Can a hybrid between two species might have a selective advantage?  Although hybridization is usually a deleterious event, it doesn’t have to be. The example I usually use are Darwin’s Finches.

Hybridization between this species and two others resulted in gene exchange, but only after the El Nino when hybrid fitness was much enhanced under the altered feeding conditions. … hybrids were at a strong disadvantage before the 1982-1983 El Nino event, and at a small advantage afterwards.

Evolution of Darwin’s Finches Caused by a Rare Climatic Event

I recently learned about another example that’s even better.  Quoting Darren Naish from his Tetrapod Zoology blog:

do have to give honorary mention to the amazing discovery that the females of S. bombifrons will preferentially mate with the males of S. multiplicata where the two occur in sympatry, and where this sympatry involves shallow, rapidly drying pools. The conclusion from this discovery is that hybridisation is adaptive in S. bombifrons: that is, that females are able to give their offspring a survival advantage by hybridising with members of another species (Pfennig 2007).

North American spadefoot toads and their incredible fast-metamorphosing, polymorphic tadpoles | Tetrapod Zoology

The reference is to Karen Pfenning’s Facultative mate choice drives adaptive hybridization (full paper here, at least for now).

A review paper discussing interspecies hybridization in general (and Pfenning’s paper in particular) is Mating with the wrong species can be right (full-ltext link):

… interspecific hybridisation … is very unequally distributed among and within taxa, and in some animals the rate of hybridisation even exceeds that in plants [2–4]. This shifted the debate from a specific comparison between plants and animals to a more general question: what traits and environmental conditions separate groups with frequent and successful hybridisation from those where it does not occur in the first place (pre-zygotic isolation) or leads to unviable or less fertile offspring with no or little chance to pass on their genes (postzygotic isolation)?